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Reds change address to honor Nuxhall

Reds name street after Nuxhall

CINCINNATI -- The Reds have changed their home address.

Great American Ball Park is still in the same spot, of course, but the Reds no longer do business at 100 Main Street.

Starting Tuesday, the club and ballpark reside at 100 Joe Nuxhall Way.

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"A new address, a beloved address," said Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune, who was one of a few city and county leaders that spearheaded the renaming effort.

A red "Joe Nuxhall Way" street sign was installed by the City of Cincinnati on Tuesday morning at the corner of Second and Main Streets.

Nuxhall, who went on to become a beloved broadcaster after his playing days ended, died on Nov. 15, 2007, from complications of lymphoma at the age of 79. Since his passing, the region has continually paid tributes to the local icon. All uniformed Reds personnel wear a black patch that says "Nuxy" on their right sleeves this season.

Tuesday was the 64th anniversary of Nuxhall's Reds debut as a 15-year-old pitcher against the Cardinals on June 10, 1944. In a fitting coincidence, the Reds were set to play the Cardinals again Tuesday. Just before the gates opened, several hundred fans applauded at a dedication ceremony. Nuxhall's oldest son, Phil, did the banner-unveiling honors that showed the new street address above the main entrance of the stadium.

Nuxhall's long-time broadcast partner, Marty Brennaman, Reds owner Bob Castellini and other club officials were also on hand.

"Joe Nuxhall is part of the Reds' DNA," Castellini said. "It's only fitting that the home of the Reds will officially reside on Joe Nuxhall Way."

When the ballpark opened in 2003, a bronze statue of Nuxhall in a pitcher's delivery was erected near the main entrance. Fans at Tuesday's game received a miniature replica of that statue.

During pregame ceremonies, the Nuxhall family was honored and the city of Hamilton presented a check for $2,008 to the Joe Nuxhall Character Education Fund. Brother Don Nuxhall threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

Mark Sheldon is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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